Is Diamond Valley Lake Open for Fishing?

Diamond Valley Lake is a magnificent reservoir located near Hemet in Riverside County, California. It is one of the largest man-made lakes in the state and was created to provide drinking water to Southern California. The lake was completed in 2003 and opened to the public in June 2004.

The lake provides a wide variety of recreational activities such as fishing, boating, camping, and picnicking. The lake has been stocked with various species of fish such as largemouth bass, bluegill, redear sunfish, crappie and catfish. There is also an abundance of wildlife along the shoreline such as ducks, geese, beavers, otters and other waterfowl.

The lake is managed by the Metropolitan Water District (MWD) of Southern California which enforces fishing regulations designed to protect the fish population. Fishing is allowed from sunrise to sunset and anglers are required to possess a valid California fishing license. A bag limit of 10 bass per day applies with only two fish over 12 inches being allowed.

In addition to fishing opportunities at Diamond Valley Lake, there are also several boat ramps located around the lake that provide access for boats of all sizes. Boats must abide by all boating regulations which include no wake zones near shorelines and speed limits.

Is Diamond Valley Lake Open for Fishing?

Yes! Diamond Valley Lake is open for fishing and offers anglers many opportunities to catch largemouth bass, bluegill and other various species of fish.

Anglers must follow all fishing regulations set forth by the MWD including a valid California fishing license, bag limits and other restrictions. Boaters must also abide by all boating regulations which include speed limits and no wake zones.

Conclusion:

Diamond Valley Lake is open for fishing as well as providing many other recreational activities for visitors such as boating, camping and picnicking. Anglers must follow all applicable rules set forth by the MWD while boaters must abide by all boating regulations when using the lake’s boat ramps.

Photo of author

Michael Allen