How Many Calories Do You Burn Scuba Diving in Warm Water?

Scuba diving is a popular activity for many people, as it provides an opportunity to explore the ocean and its wildlife. As with any physical activity, however, scuba diving can help to burn calories and improve fitness levels. So how many calories do you burn while scuba diving in warm water?

The amount of calories you burn while scuba diving will depend on a few factors. First, the temperature of the water will play a role in how many calories you burn.

The warmer the water, the more energy your body will need to expend to keep cool. Additionally, your body size and composition will determine how many calories are burned while scuba diving. Larger people typically burn more calories than smaller people.

The type of gear used during the dive can also affect calorie expenditure. Heavy gear such as steel tanks and full wet suits require more energy to move around in than lighter gear such as aluminum tanks and shorty wet suits. Finally, your activity level during the dive can influence calorie expenditure; swimming around actively will result in more calories burned than simply floating or staying still.

On average, most divers can expect to burn anywhere from 100-300 calories per hour while scuba diving in warm water (above 75 degrees Fahrenheit). This number may be higher or lower depending on the factors mentioned above.

Scuba diving is a great way to get some exercise while also exploring undersea environments.

If you’re looking for an active way to spend your time underwater, then scuba diving could be an excellent option for you! With this knowledge of how many calories are burned per hour of scuba diving in warm water, you can make sure that your time below the surface is both enjoyable and beneficial for your health.

Conclusion: On average, most divers can expect to burn 100-300 calories per hour while scuba diving in warm water (above 75 degrees Fahrenheit). This number may vary depending on factors such as body size, gear used, and activity level during the dive.

Photo of author

Lindsay Collins