How Do You Get Braided Fishing Line to Sink?

Braided fishing line is a popular choice among anglers, due to its strength and longevity. However, one of the main drawbacks is that it does not sink.

This can be a major disadvantage when fishing in deep water. Fortunately, there are several ways to get braided fishing line to sink.

One of the easiest ways to get braided line to sink is by adding a split-shot weight or other type of lead weight above the bait or lure. This will cause the line to sink quickly and allow you to reach greater depths with your bait or lure. Split-shot weights can be easily attached by using a pair of needle-nose pliers and squeezing the weights onto the line.

Another way to make braided line sink is by tying on a small rubber core weight above the bait or lure. Rubber core weights are designed specifically for this purpose and can be found at most tackle shops. Simply tie one onto your line and it will cause the entire line to sink.

Using Sinkers

Adding a sinker directly onto your braided fishing line is another way to make it sink. This method works best when fishing in areas with strong currents since it allows you to hold your bait or lure in place at any depth.

There are several types of sinkers available, including bell, egg, bank, pyramid, and cannonball varieties.

Using Fluorocarbon Leader Material

Fluorocarbon leader material is another option for making braided fishing lines sink. Fluorocarbon has a much denser structure than monofilament lines, which makes it heavier and able to reach greater depths with less effort. The leader material should be tied onto the end of your main line using an appropriate knot such as an improved clinch knot.

By following these simple steps, you can easily get braided fishing lines to sink so that you can fish in deeper waters more effectively. Whether you use split-shot weights, rubber core weights, lead sinkers, or fluorocarbon leader material; these methods will help you reach greater depths with ease.

Conclusion

Getting braided fishing lines to sink can be tricky; however it doesn’t have to be difficult if you know what methods work best for your situation. By adding split-shot weights, rubber core weights, lead sinkers or fluorocarbon leader material above your bait or lure; you can easily get your braided line sinking so that you can fish in deeper waters more effectively.

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Michael Allen